Above all else#5. “Winning souls is wise.”

Above all else#5. “Winning souls is wise.”

Guilt is a powerful motivator and is inextricably connected to repentance. Without it, we demonstrate a lack of understanding as to why we need a Saviour. It is through the Gospel that the Holy Spirit exposes guilt while offering redemption.

Thus, in our baptism, we were born again by the water and the Spirit (Jn.3:5). Therein we rejoiced, and still rejoice, that there is now no condemnation for those in Christ Jesus (Rom.8:1).

I am thankful for our Psalms, Hymns and Spiritual songs. They are gifts from heaven that teach, inspire, and correct us. But one hymn has always been unique in its bold attempt to produce guilt in saints, not sinners. You may remember it. It is called: “You never mentioned Him to me.”

The chorus runs thus:
“You never mentioned Him to me,
You helped me not the way to see;
You met me day by day and knew I was astray,
Yet never mentioned Him to me.”

You can’t help but appreciate the song’s efforts to inspire evangelistic zeal within its singers.

The writer takes you to the Judgement scene where a sinner condemned to hell, who is known to you, accosts you in his final moments with these accusing words: “You never mentioned Him to me.”

If the hymn’s guilt-factor held its effect up to the close of the Twentieth century, I assure you that precious little of that guilt was ushered into the Twenty-first century. “Guilt was dead by then!”

Those of us who long for revival must understand that revival cannot be had without an outpouring of guilt and repentance. We must come to terms with the place of “guilt” in God’s plan of Salvation for saint and sinner alike.

The writer’s concern is twofold: Firstly, he is expressing deep compassion for that lost soul. And secondly, concern that we avoid—now—any guilt due to helping that soul into hell by neglecting our opportunities to preach to him.

“Winning souls is wise.”

John Staiger

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